The Enigma of Donald Trump in the Evangelical World

(This was first published in February of 2016, before Donald Trump was chosen as the Republican nominee for President. The questions I raised then, are still my questions. Today’s budget underscores my earlier concerns.)

The enigma of Donald Trump has both fascinated and frightened those of us who believe a country should be governed by people of principle, integrity and compassion. From the very beginning of his unlikely run for the presidency of the United States, he seems to be immune to the very attitudes which would get the rest of us fired from jobs, lose friends and be banished from the world of politics.

Some people believe that he is feeding off the anger in our nation. Others that his success is a product of obstructionism in Congress. His campaign is certainly fueled by an anger that is both real and inflamed by media talk. Talk which has fanned imagined as well as genuine wrongs. I would never have thought we would get to this place in my country. I have begun to understand how Germany was given over to the Nazi’s in a different era.

What puzzles me the most is how Donald Trump has captured so many people who are Evangelical Christians. I’ve wondered, is there no correlation between faith and action? How can a follower of Jesus be a supporter of one so unlike Jesus? It isn’t that the Bible doesn’t offer some guidance. When the apostle Paul wrote to the people of Galatia, it was to give direction on how a Christian lives in the world. He bemoaned the reality he saw, of good people confused by other voices, giving into a faith that no longer resembled the faith of Jesus. He writes to them, “You were called to freedom, brothers and sisters; only do not use your freedom as an opportunity for self-indulgence, but through love become slaves to one another. For the whole law is summed up in a single commandment, ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” Galatians 5:13-14

Nothing in the campaign of Donald Trump shows any indication that he has taken seriously the words of Jesus. From his attitude toward, immigrants, minorities, women and the disabled, there has been a distinct lack of compassion, empathy or concern. So how can people of faith, accept this man as the person best prepared to lead our country? Paul goes on to talk about what a Christian looks like saying, “The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, generosity, faithfulness, gentleness, and self-control. There is no law against such things.” Galatians 5:22-23

I can understand people being angry who feel left out of the economic recovery. What I don’t understand are people of faith, turning to a person who lives so outside the values of their faith. Because if our following of Jesus is real, if it means anything at all, we ought to be growing more and more Christ-like in our attitudes, our actions, our values and our beliefs.

We should be looking at people to lead our nation whose faith is real, whose lives reflect the fruit of God’s spirit. We ought to be looking at people who are at the core of their being, filled with compassion and kindness. Political ideology aside, I want someone who reflects the values and beliefs of the faith they claim as their own.

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About Shirley Hobson Duncanson

Rev. Shirley Duncanson is a United Methodist Pastor. She is a graduate of United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities, Metro State University in Minnesota and Cleveland High School, in Cleveland MN where she grew up on a small fishing resort. Retired in 2013, she has served churches in Owatonna, Fairfax, Morton, Winona, Homer, Mounds View and most recently Hillcrest United Methodist Church in Bloomington, all in Minnesota. Shirley currently is a volunteer pastor at a nearby church. She is the mother of seven and grandmother of seven. Shirley enjoys photography, theological discussions, political discourse, book studies and reading.
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